It was an emotional holiday reunion for seven families from KYCC’s Madres Que Luchan de Hoover group. Thanks to the support from Los Angeles City Councilmember Gil Cedillo (CD1), this reunification project brought together Mexican families separated for up to 20 years.

“God bless you for all the work that you do in the community,” one family member from Mexico said. “Thank you for having us here with our families.”

CD1 has been working on this humanitarian project for over four years. Seven months ago, the women submitted their reunification applications. Their families arrived on December 10 and were able to stay in the U.S. for three weeks.

On Dec. 18, KYCC provided a special holiday meal and celebration for all reunited family members at our Wilton Center location. All of the Madres Que Luchan women immigrated from Mexico, and had not been able to return to see their loved ones.

“This effort couldn’t have been possible without KYCC’s support of community groups,” said Deisy Gutierrez, KYCC Community Organizer. “I had the pleasure of meeting all the reunited families. I’m blessed to do the work that I do here.”

Madres Que Luchan de Hoover is supported by KYCC’s Prevention Education, as part of their “environmental” approach to substance use prevention. The group is comprised of Mexican American mothers whose children are enrolled at Hoover Street Elementary School in Los Angeles.

Gutierrez supports the group with planning projects, such as community cleanups, and leadership development. Madres Que Luchan works with CD1 and the Macarthur Park Neighborhood Council to advocate for their children and families. They have been meeting weekly at the school since 2014.

Through our work with local politicians, community groups—such as Madres Que Luchan—and law enforcement agencies, KYCC’s Prevention Education is working alongside neighborhoods to build safe and healthy communities. When safety measures and policies are effectively enforced, substance abuse and crime are curtailed.

Prevention Education is funded by Substance Abuse Prevention and Control (SAPC), a division of the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health.

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